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Sharing online applications? That’s charitable

Popular opinion has it that charities are reluctant to share expertise and resources with one another. Which is why Child’s i Foundation‘s promise to make available for free its digital tools to other charities stands out as an act of goodwill.

Digital expertise is something Child’s i has in spades. The British charity, which was set up in 2008 to build a home for abandoned babies in Uganda, makes a point of using only free or low-cost resources. Up until a few months ago, for example, its website was created solely out of a free WordPress blog, though it has recently switched to a more sophisticated site.

Its developers have also created a bespoke code for its Buy a Brick fundraising campaign online, which has so far raised more than £10,000. And soon, the charity promises, the codes to both the website and the Buy a Brick tool will be available free to any charity that wants to use them.

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    I used to do accounting for small community based organisations for a period of time.

    Went around once a week or fortnight or as called to keep their books and do a on the spot draft showing a cash flow projection for the next 6 months or more as needed.

    Effective, easy to do and grateful for the unexpected small bonuses I often got.

    But then again, I had a habit of attending their Trustees meeting every other month to personally answer questions and give my thoughts as asked.

    And I never did their accounts on the basis that someone else should do it, usually an independent examiner.

    My point is that there is a niche market here for retired finance people who can be useful with non-financial matters and do the odd hours to establish a relationship.