Posts By: David Ainsworth

Experts slam tax relief proposals

There are a lot of consultations taking place at the moment into charity tax reliefs: inheritance tax relief, VAT relief on shared services, relief on gifts of pre-eminent works of art.

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Why do some smart people lose their faculties when talking about charities?

Sometimes, it seems that the topic of charity makes even intelligent people say stupid things.

The other day I had dinner with a friend of mine who I admire very much. He’s a very smart bloke, he’s made a lot of money, and he’s generous to good causes.

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Let charities run local newspapers

This week, a group of academics, journalists and charities proposed that charities should run local newspapers.
At the moment, it’s far from clear whether a newspaper can be a charity. Many legal experts think so.

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Why do some causes raise more money than others?

Last week, Cass Business School published its new Charity
Market Monitor
, which looks at the most successful fundraising charities in the
UK.

One interesting factor was the differing success of
different charities. By far the most successful sector for fundraising was
health, with Cancer Research UK and the British Heart Foundation occupying the
two top spots, and health charities accounting for more than a quarter of all
fundraising.

Read more on Why do some causes raise more money than others?…

The Standard Chartered Great City Race featured the best-dressed audience I’ve seen on a sporting occasion

Last week, three months almost to the day
after the London Marathon, I took to the streets of central London once again,
surrounded by thousands of people running for charity. Roads were closed, and
people gathered around to cheer on the runners.

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Is the sector cheering an own goal over the abolition of cheques?

On Tuesday, the charity sector celebrated an announcement from the
Payments Council that it was abandoning it target of abolishing cheques by 2018.

I think there’s a possibility that the sector may be
cheering an own goal.

Read more on Is the sector cheering an own goal over the abolition of cheques?…

There are no hard and fast rules about charity campaigning

Acevo chief executive Sir Stephen Bubb appeared before a
committee of MPs recently to issue a stirring defence of the idea that
charities must be allowed to campaign for what they believed in.

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Could merger problems be eased by matchmaking?

Our coverage of RNIB and Guide Dogs failing to find a common
path this week and last leads back to an age-old question: why aren’t there
more mergers in the charity sector?

Read more on Could merger problems be eased by matchmaking?…

Why is the charity sector being outdone by private businesses?

This week, we’ve published an analysis of
welfare-to-work provision. This is historically an area where charities have
ended up as subcontractors to private providers. Many feel the sector gets
stiffed by this process.

Read more on Why is the charity sector being outdone by private businesses?…

Fundraising and finance: the oddly successful couple

A while ago, I interviewed a finance director who claimed
she could tell which department of a charity she was in, just by looking in the
fridge.

Go into the finance department in her organisation, she
said, and the fridge was full of sensible sandwiches: ham and cheese on plain
brown bread. The fundraising department fridge, on the other hand, contained
only tofu, humus and sushi. The PR department fridge was always empty apart
from a bottle of sparkling wine.

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